Exhibits- Classical Period

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Poseidon of Artemision

Poseidon of Artemision

The famous bronze statue of the Poseidon or Zeus of Artemisios. The god is depicted with legs spread wide, the left arm stretched out to the side and the right slightly bent, ready to launch a trident or a bolt of thunder. It is possibly the work of the sculptor Kalamis. It was found in the sea off the coast of Artemision. Two metres in height.

It dates from around 450 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 15161

Head of Irida

Head of Irida

Head of Irida, the winged escort of the gods. Consisting of the top left hand corner of a stone from the eastern frieze of the Parthenon, the goddess is shown as a young girl in profile to the left, with her wings outstretched behind her. She is pulling her hair upwards with her fingers.

It dates from 447-432 b.C.

Acropolis Museum, catalogue number 855

Head of the Diadem Wearer

Head of the Diadem Wearer

Work of the famous sculptor Polyklitos. The work shows an athlete, a winner who is tying a ribbon (diadem) around his hair. The original statue from 430BC was bronze. The marble copy was found in the home of Diadoumenos of Dilos.

It dates from around 430 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 1826

Head of Hera

Head of Hera

Head of Hera from the Hereon of Argos. The wavy hair of the goddess, who was the sister and wife of Zeus, is tied with a wide ribbon. It is the work of an Argian sculptor from the school of Polyklitos. The goddess has a noble and peaceful expression. The opinion has been expressed that this head did not belong to a statue of Hera, but to a statue of Ivi, who according to legend was the daughter of Zeus and Hera and was the personification of youth.

It dates from around 420 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 1571

Nike loosening her sandal

Nike loosening her sandal

A relief marble tablet from the rest of the temple of Athena Nike. It shows the famous ‘sandal loosener’. Victory, who is bending down to the left, is undoing or fastening one of her sandals. A thin tunic covers her young body, in thick folds, or in thin folds that all the details of her breast and stomach are easily perceived.

It dates from around 410 b.C.

Acropolis Museum, catalogue number 973

Echelos and the Nymph Vasili

Echelos and the Nymph Vasili

Relief in the shape of a small temple with gable and sides. The hero Echelos and the Nymph Vasili are depicted on a chariot drawn by 4 horses to the right. The horses are lead forward to the left by Hermes, shown with open stride. His tunic, fastened with a clasp at the neck, flows out behind him. This work is a double relief. In other words the original has another relief picture on the other side, which shows the goddess Artemis, the river Kiphisos and Nyphs.

It dates from around 410 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 178

Grave Stele of Hegeso

Grave Stele of Hegeso

Relief gravestone in the shape of a small temple. The stone shows two women. One, seated to the right is Igisso, the daughter of Proxenos, according to the engraved inscription. Igasso is wearing a tunic and a cloak, which covers the back of her head. The other woman, a slave, is upright and dressed without a belt. She is holding out a small box to her mistress from which, with a characteristic movement, the dead woman is removing a piece of jewellery that would have originally been shown in colour. It is considered one of the finest Attican gravestones.

It dates from around 400 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 3624

Slab from Parthenon, horsemen

Slab from Parthenon, horsemen

Stone II from the western frieze of the Parthenon. As it is well-known, this frieze shows the Panathenian procession and consists of four basic themes: the riders, those on foot, the sacrifice and the presentation of the mantle. It took up the middle section on the eastern side of the temple. On this stone we have the start of the procession with two riders. The one in front, wearing a robe clasped at the neck, turns his head to the rider who is following and at the same time raises his left arm. This stone is one of the many that was seized by Lord Elgin.

British Museum

Grave Stele of Dexileos

Grave Stele of Dexileos

The famous gravestone of the cavalry soldier Dexileos, who was killed in the battle of Corinth in 394 BC. It was found in the cemetery at Keramikos.

It dates from around 390 b.C.

Kerameikos Museum in Athens, catalogue number 1003

Grave Stele of Selino

Grave Stele of Selino

The young woman shake hands for goodbye with Niko who is obviously a nurse to the infant called Minnaki, who she is holding. In her other hand she is holding a mirror.

It dates from around 370 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 901

Votive relief to Asclepius

Votive relief to Asclepius

Asklipios is examining a woman, who is lying down. Behind them is a young woman. It was found in Pireus.

It dates from the 4th century b.C.

Piraeus Museum, catalogue number 405

Hands - greeting

Hands - greeting

Two human hands in a shake of greeting, as a gesture often found in Attican tombstone reliefs of the 4th century.

Relief of Zeus

Relief of Zeus

Marble votive relief. Seated on the throne is possibly the figure of smiling Zeus, who is holding a bottle. Before him are supplicants, the first of whom is kneeling.

It dates from around 350 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 1408

Base of a tripod

Base of a tripod

The front side of the square base for a bronze tripod. It shows a rider heading towards a tripod. The other side is engraved with the name of the sculptor Vriaxis.

It dates from around 350 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 1733

The Hermes of Praxiteles

The Hermes of Praxiteles

The God is carrying the young Dionysus to the Nymphs, who will raise him. He is resting against the trunk of a tree, on which he has thrown his tunic and is resting his left hand, which holds the child. With great skill the artist has rendered the naked form of the young man and the head of the god, with short curly hair, dreamy eyes and small mouth. It is the work of the famous Athenian sculptor, Praxitelis.

It dates from around 330 b.C.

Museum of Olympia, catalogue number 17

Head of Asclepius

Head of Asclepius

Marble head of Asklipios from Amorgos.

It dates from 4th century b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 323

Tragic Mask

Tragic Mask

Bronze tragic actors mask, with long, curly hair and beard. It was found in Piraeus and is now on display in the museum there.

It dates from the 4th century b.C.

Piraeus Museum, catalogue number 4649

Head of the goddess Hygeia

Head of the goddess Hygeia

Found in the temple of Alea Athena in Tegea, Peloponnese.

It dates from 360 b.C.

National Archaeological Museum, catalogue number 3602